Stucco Repair in Las Vegas, Nevada

How Do You Select the Best Stucco Repair Company in Las Vegas?

So you’ve made the decision to have stucco applied to your home. Or, maybe you just need a repair. Either way, you’ll need to look up stucco contractors in Las Vegas so that the project can be completed. You may be tempted to just open up a phone book and call the first contractor with a big ad, but that is not the way to go. Just about anyone can take out an ad, and having a larger one only means that they spent a little more money on advertising. Like any other skilled trade, learning how to apply stucco is not only an art but a science as well. Having the proper insurance, bonding, employees, portfolio of satisfied clients and ethical business practices should be the criteria you base hiring a contractor on. Doing an initial background check on a potential contractor now will save you copious amounts of work later.

Stucco Sealer

First, you need to establish exactly what your project will entail. Then you need to contact a few contractors and ask them for a cost quote. It’s a good idea to let them know right away that you are going to be speaking to several contractors to see what their bids are. This can save you time when trying to negotiate a good price. Throw in some terminology about your specific project if you can. You will appear to be more knowledgeable than the average customer, so you will be less likely to be taken advantage of. Once you have gotten a few quotes, look for the median price. A good contractor will price fairly. Too low of a price may indicate an inexperienced contractor, while a high price may be a predatory contractor. Find the three or four contractors that are close to the median price and contact them for more information.

Stucco Waterproofing

Qualified stucco contractors will have up to date insurance and licensing. This information will either be on hand, or in their office. Asking to view or make a copy of their paperwork is neither rude nor uncommon. If a contractor acts insulted or repeatedly gives excuses as to why the paperwork cannot be produced, you probably shouldn’t do business with them. Whether these are stalling tactics or they are just really unorganized, they are indicators of an unprofessional business person.

How to Repair Synthetic Stucco

Making the decision to do any large amount of work to your home is a little nerve wracking to say the least. You have to decide what you feel is the main priority and who is going to be best suited to do the work. As any do it yourselfer who has ended up with a less than well done home improvement project can tell you, you are often better off to let the professionals handle it. Take the exterior stucco contractors for example. If you have never dealt with finding and hiring such a well trained, specific contractor before, the task can seem overwhelming. With a little bit of knowledge about stucco and contractors in general, you won't have any trouble deciding on the right professional for your project.

As with any kind of home improvement help, with exterior stucco contractors, the first thing you want to do is get together a list of names. You can find this list from the phone book, online resources, or better yet, from someone you know personally who has worked with the contractors before. Try to find at least 3 different stucco contractors to talk to. They should be willing to come to your home, look the house over, and offer a free estimate. While you have the exterior stucco contractor's undivided attention, be sure to ask him or her any pressing questions that might be on your mind.

As any of the exterior stucco contractors can doubtless tell you, applying stucco is much like painting a picture. Every contractor has his or her own way of doing it. One contractor's texture and finish is nothing like the next ones. You can be sure you will be happy with the results by asking to see samples of every exterior stucco contractor's work you interview. Prices aren't likely to vary much, but your reference for their work certainly will. Once you have chosen your contractor, you can look forward to a brand new look for your home.

Stucco Sealer

How to Repair Stucco Foundations

Stucco has been use to protect and decorate exterior and interior walls and ceilings for many centuries. Stucco is available in dozens of textures, thousands of colors and is currently the cladding of choice for most new construction and remodel or restoration projects.

The two main categories of exterior stucco that encompass dozens of different systems are Hard Coat Stucco and EIFS (Exterior Insulation and Finish System). Hard Coat Stucco is the preferred system for residential or multifamily construction, and is being used increasingly for commercial projects since it is more economical. EIFS is more commonly used for commercial building projects, but is often also used for high-end custom homes.

Hard Coat Stucco is typically applied in 2-3 coats with a cementitious base coat. Two commonly used hard coat stucco systems are called One Coat Stucco and Three Coat Stucco. Traditional Three Coat Stucco consists of two coats of a cement base and one finish coat. One Coat Stucco is actually a two-coat process but instead of two base coats it consists of one cementitious base coat with one finish coat. In the last few decades One Coat Stucco has become much more popular simply because of the cost. The materials used and application process are virtually the same for both systems, other than the exception of One Coat Stucco taking fewer steps and less time. The design ability and performance between the two systems are also the same, although Three Coat Stucco is typically stronger and will crack less in most circumstances.

The finish coat application of both hard coat systems is the same. There are numerous finish options but they can be consolidated into a few categories which are: Integrally Colored Stucco, Painted Stucco, and Acrylic Finishes. Colored cement finishes or "colored stucco" was the popular choice over Three Coat Stucco for most of the 20th century. It is simply a mixture of cement, lime, sand and pigment. It is inexpensive and easy to apply, however, if the base coat cracks the finish is almost guaranteed to crack. Colored Stucco will stain easily, is hard to repair, and allows water to pass freely through it (which can be good or bad depending on what part of the country the system is applied within). It is usually applied by hand and can achieve virtually any finish imaginable.

Painted Stucco has been around almost as long, and is the majority of the finishes being used today. Painted Stucco is the same mixture of materials less the color, so it is applied the same and will achieve all the textures that integrally colored stucco will. The final step with Painted Stucco is the paint application. The paint, or as some like to call "coating", will look more vibrant and is easier to patch. Color options are vast and it is important that a good quality stucco paint is used. The most desired stucco finish today is Acrylic Stucco or Acrylic Finish. Some will call this system Synthetic Stucco, which is somewhat correct since it is a synthetic finish, however it is not a synthetic system.

Acrylic Finish is available in as many colors as a paint and has the same chemical make up as paint, but is a much thicker application. This does raise the cost of the overall system, but offers many benefits that the other two finishes do not. Acrylic Stucco will bridge most all hairline cracks and does not allow water to travel freely into the system, which is a huge benefit in freeze/thaw zones. Acrylic Stucco will keep it's look and typically will not require any maintenance for many years, whereas painted stucco must be repainted and repaired within a few years. Colored Stucco stains easily, will show every crack and is very difficult to repair.

EIFS is a full synthetic system or what most will call Synthetic Stucco. EIFS systems weigh much less than traditional stucco and are much more flexible. Although most EIFS adhesives and base coats are cement based, they are heavily polymer modified so they are considered synthetic. These type of systems have been used successfully for many decades but are much newer in the stucco world. Most all EIFS systems use EPS (Expanded Polystyrene) insulation board which is usually adhesively attached to the substrate and sometimes mechanically attached. The EPS adds insulation to the wall assembly, absorbs movement better than any other stucco cladding used today, and adds many design options.

The original or traditional EIFS systems all used a cement-based adhesive and/or mechanical fasteners for the EPS, fiberglass netting for reinforcement and to gauge base coat thickness, cement base coat, and an acrylic finish. These systems are known as Barrier EIFS. Since these systems are so watertight, they've had some problems such as not allowing water to escape after it had travelled into the system because of improper application and flashing. The industry quickly designed Drainage EIFS or Water Managed EIFS which some manufacturers had and promoted before these issues arrived. Drainage EIFS systems have been very popular in recent years and include added or altered components such as notched or channeled EPS, plastic trim, trowel or roller-applied waterproof coatings. These systems seem to have remedied the water drainage problem of years past. The finish coat options for EIFS are not as vast as they are for Hard Coat Stucco. Since EIFS is a "soft system" or synthetic system, cement finishes will not work unless they are acrylic or polymer modified.

Most EIFS manufacturers have their recommended systems and will not warranty their products if deviated from the original specifications. Almost every final coat for EIFS consists of an acrylic emulsion and marble or silica sand finish that is hand-troweled over the base coat. Acrylic finish is integrally colored and very flexible. There are a few standard textures that acrylic finishes provide, including Smooth Finish, Sand Finish, and Rilled or Swirl Finish. These finishes, which are expensive, are usually applied in one coat at a thickness of 5/32" or less. Many different textures are possible by multilayering an acrylic finish.


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Stucco Foundation Repair in Las Vegas, Nevada

Choices For Home Exterior Materials

If your home improvement project involves stucco in Las Vegas, you will want to be sure you find the right contractor for the job. It is always important to hire good contractors, but it is especially important when they will be doing work such as stucco installation, which is not as common as other contracting duties. You need to work with a people who know how do to the job properly, so you can be sure it will get done right the first time.

Stucco Sealant

When you get the bids, make sure to ask if the work will be guaranteed once it is completed. A quality stucco contractor will stand firmly behind their work, so don’t hesitate to ask this question. If the labor and material are not covered by some form of guarantee, you should quickly move on to the next bid. There are plenty of contractors out there who are willing to stand behind their work, so there is no reason to work with one who isn’t.

Stucco can be messy business. Make sure there is a plan in place to protect the rest of your property from the mess that can be made when stucco is put in. You don’t want to be left with a huge cleanup project after your contractor has left the job site, so ask specific questions as to how they will keep the rest of your property as clean as possible.

Exterior Plaster Finishes

Hiring a stucco contractor doesn’t need to be a long and drawn out process, as long as you know what you are looking for from the start. Use the points above to guide your search, and only hire a contractor once you are fully satisfied that they are the perfect selection for the work that you need completed.

Stucco Options

Choosing the right exterior housing material can be a difficult search for the homeowner building a house, or for the homeowner remodeling their home's exterior. With all of the options available, it can be difficult to choose the one that will be the best fit for the house, the best bargain for the money, and the most durable. There are several options today that are very popular including stucco, siding, and brick. Each option has pros and cons, so finding the one with the most benefits can be difficult. To help in the search, a few of the many benefits of stucco are listed below.

One of the reasons that so many people value stucco as an exterior building material is its versatility. It's great for both residential and commercial uses and can be used on many different architectural styles. It can be directly applied to a solid base, such as a concrete or masonry wall. This makes it ideal in more than one application. Two of the major benefits of stucco are its durability and breathability. When dried, stucco is extremely hard and very impact-resistant. It will stay in place for decades. It's also fire-resistant. Because of its breathability, stucco is an ideal exterior material in a variety of climates. Whether it's applied in a hot and dry area or a warm and wet climate, it will stay intact for years. If water gets behind the stucco, it won't become trapped there because the material is able to transmit moisture and water vapor. This drastically reduces the chance of mold or rot. These benefits make it a great exterior material.

Exterior Stucco Board

How to Repair Stucco Siding on Your Home

What's Stucco?

Stucco has been used in architectural structures since the Greek and Roman era and during the Renaissance. It spread throughout Europe and gradually became popular in America. Stucco is a finishing plaster composed of sand, lime, water and other ingredients. It is a strong, attractive and damage resistant covering for walls and ceilings. It is an excellent building material for hot areas as it helps to regulate the temperature. It is non-combustible and its surface burning properties include no flame spread and no smoke development.

Currently, there are two distinct types of Stuccoes -

Traditional/Hard Coat Stucco - This is basically cement mixed Stucco. The traditional stucco is durable and able to withstand harsh environments. It is porous and can breathe, so, dries quickly and resists water damage.

Conventionally, lime was used with sand and water. As lime is slightly soluble, the mixture has a self-healing tendency. At present, stuccoes are usually made up of Portland Cement, sand and water resulting in a hard and brittle variety.

To install hard coat stucco, first the substrate is installed followed by a metal lath and then a coat of stucco is applied with a trowel. It is allowed to set and then another coating is applied. Normally, the process involves a scratch coat, a brown coat and a finish coat (may be colored).

Stucco can also be applied on a paper and wire. The coats should be thicker. The first coat (scratch coat) covers the wire. It needs to be scratched as soon as it sets. The second coat (brown coat) gets bonded to this coat and as usual the finish coat is the outermost layer.

Synthetic Stucco - Since 1950s, a number of houses were built using a variety of synthetic materials resembling stucco. Fibers and synthetic acrylics were added to the cement stucco mixture to add strength and flexibility. In general though, the synthetic stuccoes are less heavy and hence, more susceptible to a hard blow. They are a one-coat stucco system unlike the three-coat traditional ones.

The most common one is EIFS or Exterior Insulation & Finish Systems. They are glued or mechanically attached to the substrate and usually composed of three layers. The innermost layer, mostly made up of polystyrene like material, is a foam insulation board. The second layer is a base coating attached to a fiberglass mesh and the final layer is a finish colored coat. It became popular because of its easy installation, low cost and better insulation properties. The only disadvantage is moisture absorption which causes water damage to the building.

A variety of stucco colors/paints are available. Colorants are inorganic pigments which can adapt with the high pH value of cement. They can be either natural like, Ochers and natural earths or artificial, such as man made Iron Oxides. Natural colorants remain unaffected to UV rays and are more pleasant to our eyes. But, the range of shades and the tinting strength is less when compared to manufactured colors. Man made colors, on the other hand, offer a wider range of shades such as dark blues and greens as well as various earthy tones like, yellow, brown and reds. They also possess excellent UV stability due to the presence of inorganic pigments.

Generally, $6-$9 per square foot is the effective cost for stucco installation. A proper inspection of the building is must before the installation. It is always advised to use a better quality beforehand rather than paying later for damage repair.

Stucco Cracks When To Worry

Stucco Repair in Las Vegas, Nevada